The 14th Street Y will be closing on Monday, September 26, and Tuesday, September 27 for Rosh Hashanah. Programming will resume as usual on Wednesday, September 28. L’Shana Tova!

Tikkun: Dawn

A Cosmic Reunion

DAWN: A Cosmic Reunion 
An all-night cultural arts festival celebrating the Jewish holiday Shavuot 

Presented by Reboot, the Jewish Emergent Network and LABA: A Laboratory for Jewish Culture 

Sunday, May 16 – Monday, May 17 | 9:00 PM – 9:00 AM 

The 14th Street Y’s LABA artists are joining Reboot for this year’s “choose-your-own” experiential adventure in partnership with the Jewish Emergent Network and LABA’s Into the Night Tikkun Leil Shavuot.

DAWN will provide something for everyone throughout the 12 hours of music, film, comedy, dance, food and teaching across multiple channels.

While the world still longs for the opportunity to gather in person, DAWN provides the opportunity to gather apart for a tradition of in-person artistic celebrations that will live beyond this pandemic.


About Reboot

Reboot is an arts and culture nonprofit that reimagines, reinvents and reinforces Jewish thought and traditions. As a premier R&D platform for the Jewish world, we catalyze our Reboot Network of preeminent creators, artists, entrepreneurs and activists to produce experiences and products that evolve the Jewish conversation and transform society.

About The Jewish Emergent Network

The Jewish Emergent Network comprises the leaders of seven path‐breaking Jewish communities from across the United States who have come together in the spirit of collaboration. These include: IKAR in Los Angeles, Kavana in Seattle, The Kitchen in San Francisco, Mishkan in Chicago, Sixth & I in Washington, D.C., and Lab/Shul and Romemu in New York.

The seven communities in the Network do not represent any one denomination or set of religious practices. What they share is a devotion to revitalizing the field of Jewish engagement, a commitment to approaches both traditionally rooted and creative, and a demonstrated success in attracting unaffiliated and disengaged Jews to a rich and meaningful Jewish practice. While each community is different in form and organizational structure, all have taken an entrepreneurial approach to this shared vision, operating outside of conventional institutional models, rethinking basic assumptions about ritual and spiritual practice, membership models, staff structures, the religious/cultural divide and physical space.